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Welcome to the PostalJobHotLine.Com's U.S. Postal Exam 473.




This Postal Exam Guide contains the study materials for the U.S. Postal Exam 473, which covers the most popular and sought-after entry level jobs offered by the United State Postal Service. The most popular and sought-after entry level jobs are: Mail Carrier, Window Clerk, Mail Handler, Flat Sorting Machine Operator, and Mark-Up Clerk.

If you're looking for one of those jobs mentioned above, you can proceed with the remainder of this book and begin studying for the exam. You'll find all the materials that you need to study for the U.S. Postal Exam 473 right here. So if you're ready, let's get started:

Please begin your study in the order of the following:

  1. Address Checking
  2. Forms Completion
  3. Coding & Memory
  4. Life Experience





The exam materials are organized into four parts:

SESSION                           NUMBER OF QUESTIONS   TIME LIMIT
=======                           ===================   ==========
Part A: Address Checking          60 questions          11 minutes

Part B: (Forms Completion)        30 questions          15 minutes

Part C: (Coding and Memory)       72 questions(total)   13 minutes
       Coding Section             36 questions           6 minutes
       Memory Section             36 questions           7 minutes

Part D: (Personal Characteristics &
       Experience Inventory.      236 questions(total)  90 minutes
       Personal Characteristics   160 questions(total)
       Experience Inventory       76  questions(total)
The actual exam process begins in the order listed above, which is in Part A: The Address Checking Section, followed by Part B (Forms Completion), followed by Part C (Coding & Memory), followed by Part D (Personal Characteristics & Life Experiences Section) and end the exam session after part D.

In the actual Battery Test 473, the test examiner provides instructions for completing each part. You must listen carefully to the examiner's instructions and take action accordingly. You will be given tests for each part for all fourt parts in the order listed above, which is part A, B, C, and D. You must work on one part of the Battery Test 473 at a time, and if you finish a part of the test before time is called, you are not allowed to proceed to another part of the test or return to a part of the test you previously completed.

The whole exam process takes about 2 and a half hours (2 hours and 30 minutes). Half of that time is spent for administrative of work--like filling out forms and paperworks and the likes. So be prepared for that kind of chores by bringing all the necessary identifications, employment history and other related information when you are heading to the test site.

   Good Luck!!!


Useful Tips On Getting A Job At the U.S. Postal Services



General Information


The U.S. Postal Service offers exam on a needed-basis. This means that if the Postal Service still have some qualified exam applicants on its Register, the Postal Service will not offering any exam until it runs low on qualified exam applicants in its Register.

The U.S. Postal Service usually hires exam applicants down to the score of 90, and they start to replenish their registers again by giving out more exams to the general public through a public announcement on its toll free (1-800) job hotline, on its bullitin boards in the lobby of your local post offices, on the public bulletin boards in local, state, and federal municipal buildings, state employment offices, community organizations, et cetera.

In some U.S. Postal districts, they even advertise the Exam Announcements on its local medias--such as newspapers, TV's, Radios, and through other means, such as flyers, postcard mailings, magazines, et cetera.

In most cities, the U.S. Postal Service job hotline is listed on its local phonebook, and some cities don't list their job hotlines on their local phonebook at all.

You would need to call your main Post Office personnel and ask for a Job Hotline number so that you can keep calling that number to hear an audio recording about any upcoming exam announcement.

The exam cycle is varied from district to district. Some urban districts offer exam more frequent than the rural, less density or populated districts.

The densely populated districts like New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, The Twin Cities (Minneapolis/St. Paul), Philadelaphia, Dallas, or San Francisco usually takes about 2 years to get the exam announcement offerings.

So keep calling your local district Job Hotline regularly, or if you have internet access, you can find Exam Announcements online, by going to the U.S. Postal Service Exam site: Apply For Exam!

Or at http://www.USPS.com/Employment



Transition Employees (or TEs)


The United States Postal Service also has a quicker way of giving people a chance to become a regular full-time, career United States Postal Service employee by hiring transition employees. Transition employees (or TEs) are part-time non-career employees and do not receive benefits such health benefit, pension, 401(k) plan, and other benefits that all other (regular full-time career) United States Postal Service employees receive.

Transition employees generally are substitutes that take over duties in the event of regular full-time career employees are absent, on vacation, or unable to work due to injuries, sickness, or other causes of absent.

As stated above, transition employees are part-time, non-career employees. Don't let that statement discourages you--since this is the only quicker way of getting in the United States Postal Service workforce system and become a full-time career United Postal Service employee. There is no other quicker way of becoming a United States Postal employee other than first becoming a part-time, non-career transition employee.

Just like it sounds, transition employees are employees "in transition" that eventually will be transitioned (or transfered or converted) from transition employee status to a regular full-time, career employee status in the future.

Even though transition employees are part-time, non-career employees in status, they generally are averaging about 38 to 50 hours of work per week. This is sufficient income for them to make a living for awhile until they become or transision to regular full-time, career employees--usually about three to four years of wait. The starting pay is comparable to the starting pay for other new hires off the register list--and it is between $21-$22 per hour as of 2010 and this rate will increase as year increases.

To get 38 to 50 hours of work per week, you will need to be flexible in your daily life scheduling and stay by your phone--ready for a phone to ring--between the hours of 5.00 A.M. and 8.00 A.M. (in the morning)--Monday through Saturday. If no phone calls after 8.00 A.M. (in the morning), you can very much write it off as your day off, since all assignments are all completely assigned by 8.00 A.M. (in the morning).

Most often you will be notified to show up for work in advance if the assignments open up prior to you leaving the office. Most often you will know in advance that you will need to come to work for the next day, the whole week, two weeks, three weeks, or even longer if that particular regular full-time employee becomes unavailable to work as a result of sickness, injuries, and other causes of absent.

If you're discouraged by the fact that you have to sit by your phone to get called or afraid that you might not get the necessary hours to make your living viable, don't be discourage or afraid--because you'll get plenty of hours without having to sit by your phone waiting for a phone to ring or without having to be sent home for lacking of work or without being called to work at all.

I can tell you this: At the United States Postal Service--snow, sleet, rain or shine-- the mail must go through. This means that the work is always recession-proof--regardless of what the economy is doing--and there are plenty of work for anyone who's willing to work. It is a fact that there are more hours than anyone[/you] cares to want. It is also a fact that most people (TEs) complaint for having to work too much. So if you like to work and want more work hours, you will get plenty of work hours regardless of your employment status. You can still make a living being a TE and the pay is comparable to regular new hires as full-time career employees from the register list.

But the only drawback is that your time spent during your TE years will not carry forward to your new time as a full-time career employee--so when you transition to a full-time career employee, it becomes day one all over again and your time spent during your TE years is lost or wasted.

There has been a lot of talks about making TE's status retroactive to the first day TEs started as a TE and eventually (I think) in the near future, there is the likelyness that the United Postal Service will change the policy and make TE's status retroactive permenantly.

Nevertheless, it is a good idea to first start as a TE since you'll never know when the United States Postal Service is accepting applications again or you'll never know whether the United States Postal Service is running low on its registers. You ended up waiting and waiting anyhow and why not get started earning your living and get yourself in the door of the United Postal Service by becoming a TE while everybody else is waiting for the United Postal Service to announce to the public that it accepts applications for the exams.

To become a TE, you'll need to call your main Post Office personnel and ask for a Job Hotline number so that you can keep calling that number to hear an audio recording about any information regarding an upcoming exam announcement, TEs hiring, and other related information. In most cities, the U.S. Postal Service job hotline is listed on its local phonebook, and some cities don't list their job hotlines on their local phonebook at all, and in that case, you'll need to call your main Post Office personnel and ask for a Job Hotline number.

In the phone call conversation, make sure you tell the answering personnel that you are interested in becoming a TE and also would like to know when the United States Postal Service is accepting new applications for the general exams (Exam 460 or Exam 473). Usually you may be directed to talk to other personnel in charge of that particular duties and you'll have to be patience and be persistent in getting what you're trying to get--that is, the toll-free hotline number for job announcement and TEs hirings.

When you apply for a TE position, you'll still need to pass the test (either the 460-Rural Carriers test or 473-test for other positions) of a score of at least 70. If you scored below 70, you won't be hired as a TE. The different between the score for TEs and the score for full-time career employees test is that TEs' score only requires a passing score of 70 in order to get hired as a TE, whereas the full-time career employees' score need to be very high in order to get hired--usually a score of 90 or above.

So when you apply for a TE position, you will be given a test and when you finished the test, the test is graded and the result is mailed to you about two to three weeks after you take the test. If you pass the test (of a score of at least 70), your score is placed in a TEs' register and be placed according to your score standing. That is, the highest scores appear at the top of the register list and any subsequent score appears one step lower one another until all TE scores of 70 are completely listed.

The United States Postal Service hires TEs with the highest score first and trickles down to whatever scores until the maximum hiring is achieved. By contract agreement with the Postal Unions which represent Postal employees, the United States Postal Service can only hires a certain number of TEs in a contract cycle of five years. So the contract cycle of 2006-2011 states that the United States Postal Service can only hires 15,000 TEs nation wide. So the TE positions are very small compared to the regular hiring positions. Nevertheless, it's a good idea to try to get the TE position whenever you can.

When your TE exam score is up, you will be notified by mail that your score is next in line and you're instructed to show up to do job orientation and other employment screening processes such as background check, physical examination, drug test, etc. Just follow the instructions in the mailing and you're okay.

Once all the pre-employment processes completed, you will be told to show up for work at the designated location(s) and at this point, you are officially an employee of the United States Postal Service--albeit, a part-time, non-career employee.

If you fail the test, it will state that your score doesn't measure up to the grade and your score is not placed in the register for further employment consideration. There maybe a lot of people showing up to take the TE exam and some of them may not pass the test and some of them may score very high and those people will be called first (quickly in a few weeks after the test). The higher your score the better chance you get called first.

That's why before you show up to take the test for TE, you need to study the test materials offered here in this website. And that's not all, your score in the TE test is placed in the regular register as well among other scores already in the register.

If your score is high or very high in the upper 90's to mid 100's, you may not have to be a TE very long, since your score is most likely is next in line to be called when the United States Postal Service decides to hire new workers off the register.

If your score is low (70 to 89), you won't get called any time soon since other people's scores maybe way ahead of your score. In that case, you can still get your score to be higher by taking the test again six months after you'd became a TE. That's right, you can take another test (or more tests as many times as you like--although you can only take one test every six month) to get a better score.

This means that if you became a TE, you can request the United States Postal Personnel to give you a test every six month until you satisfied with your score. Don't just request to take the test every six months without study and practice first, since if your scores don't improve substantially, the test administrator will not allow you to take the test again and again and again without significant improvement and without end in sight.

So by all mean, you need to become a TE first in order to become a full-time career employee quicker.

As soon you finished reading this information, you should quickly try to call your local United States Postal Service district personnel and ask how you can become a TE. Usually you can find out how you can become a TE by just calling your local United States Postal Service district's job hotline toll-fress number.

So don't wait for the United States Postal Service to announce for a new offering of the exam applications--just try to become a TE instead and you'll be able to get into the register quicker than if you wait for the regular announcement of the new exam offering.

This is the ONLY quick, backdoor way of getting into the United States Postal Service workforce permanently--THERE IS NO OTHER WAY.

>>>> Good Luck!!!!



General Information for Non-Transision Employees (or Non-TEs)


The following are some tips on job seeking process for non-TEs at the U.S. Postal Service--for TEs, follow the instruction just outlined above.

At the time you showed up at the exam location, you would need to copy the address of the U.S. Postal Service district's Registrar Personnel Office so that in case your address changed in the future while you are waiting for your score to be called, you would need to notify them by writing a short letter telling them to update your address.

When your score is next in line to be called, you will be notified by mail by your U.S. Postal Service district personnel.

So it is very important that you have your correct address on file with the U.S. Postal Service district personnel registrar.

When you received the employment notification from the U.S. Postal Service Personnel, you need to read the instruction(s) carefully, fill out all forms completely, and bring it with you during your job interview (or mail it to the personnel within the period specified by the mailing literature instructions--if the instruction says to mail it).

So please read the instruction(s) that came with the employment notification, carefully. In that employment notification literature, the U.S. Postal district personnel may require that you call the U.S. Postal district personnel to make an appointment for a job interview. Or, it may require that you fill out all forms completely and mail it to the personnel within the period specified by the mailing literature instructions. Again, please read the instruction(s) that came with the employment notification, carefully.

If you don't respond within the time period specified by the mailing literature, your name will be removed from the register completely and you will not be called for employment again.

The U.S. Postal Service considers a "No Respond" as a "No Longer Interested In Employment at the U.S. Postal Service".

Before a new employee is allowed to work at the U.S. Postal Service, that new employee has to pass some background checks, and has to pass some physical and mental health check-ups.

All of the background checks and physical and mental health check-ups are performed by the U.S. Postal Service personnels.

A new employee also need to be trained in before he/she is allowed to work at the U.S. Postal Service.

When a new employee arrives at a unit (work place), management and the JIT(s) (Job Instructor Trainer(s) will decide who will train and on what type of position(s) or route(s)(for mail carriers) to train the new employee on.

In other words, you will be trained by expert trainers on the position that you applied for.

Before you can gain a "Permanent Employment" status at the U.S. Postal Service, you would need to pass a "PROBATION" period.

A probation period is designed to weed out un-qualified applicants from the U.S. Postal Service employment workforce.

In other words, the U.S. Postal Service wants only the people that can perform the job that they applied for.

The probation period begins on the first day on the job and ends 90 days later.

During the next 90 days, upervisor(s) will keep closer eyes on you, evaluating your job performance almost on a daily basis.

Four job performance reviews will be conducted by your supervisor(s)
during the 90 days probation period:

           the 1st one at the 30 days on-the-job mark;
           the 2nd one at the 45 days on-the-job mark;
           the 3rd one at the 60 days on-the-job mark;
           and the 4th and last one at the 80 days mark.

After 90 days, you will be told by your supervisor(s) whether you are hired permanently or not.

It is crucial that you take this 90 days probation seriously. Anything you do will be judged on its merit.

The 90 days probation does not apply to extraoardinary circumstances or incidences, such as theft, safety of other employees, misuse of postal equipment(s) or properties, inappropriate behavior, etc.

In such case(s), a notification of termination is given immediately and you do not have any recourse whatsoever--you're fired!!!

For all new employees, a strong emphasis is placed on "safety conduct" by each employee during job performance. This means that any action you take that deemed unsafe and harzzardous to yourself, to others, or to your fellow employees will be taken into consideration in your job performance evaluation.

For mail carriers, a strong emphasis is placed on "safty conduct" and "safe driving" of a U.S. Postal vehicle.

Any accident--no matter how minor the accident is--a notification of termination is given immediately.

A back-up into someone else property or fixed object can and will get you terminated immediately.

So please be very very extreme careful when operating a U.S. Postal Service vehicle in the 90-day probation period.

All access to the inside of the vehicle must be in-accessible while you're not in attendance. In other words, lock all vehicle doors when you are not near the vehicle and out of site of the vehicle.

A strong emphasis is also placed on the operation of the U.S. Postal Service vehicles--especially the engine and the safety brake of the vehicle.

Do not let the engine running unattended. The engine is running only if you are sitting on the driving seat. If you need to get out of your driving seat, turn the engine off and put safety brake on.

The brake lock (or safety brake) must be applied when the vehicle is not in operation. In other words, the saftey brake must be applied when you're not sitting in the driving seat.

You should not move to the passenger's seat or to the back of the vehicle to retrieve something if the engine is still running. In other words, you should not get out of the driving seat while the engine is still running.

If you need to get away from the driving seat, please remember to turn the engine off and put on the brake lock.

You will be taught all of these and more stuffs when you are in the training session. Always think saftey first and you should be okay. You will hear safety talks by your supervisors on a daily basis, reminding everyone that safety is a big deal and everyone should practice saftey first.

Those are just a few tips to help you enhance your chances of gaining employment at the U.S. Postal Service.

 

Summary


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U.S. Postal Exam 473: Practice Sessions



Due to the nature of random selection, each exercise you're working on is different from the ones you previously worked on, even the most recent ones you'd just worked on, say, a few moments ago. Each time you select an exercise, the program automatically generates a new exercise for you to work on. This ensures that you receive a fresh new material each time you select an exercise, giving you a complete new material to work on. This strengthens your skill and enhances your chance of success. For better chance of success, please PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE! PRACTICE! ........



   Online Practice Sessions

These online practice sessions allow you to practice online anywhere you want whenever you want if you have access to the internet. This makes it convenient while saving money on printing.

When you're ready, you can proceed to do the practice sessions by choosing the options below. Due to the nature of random selection, each time you press a selection (below), it will generate a different practice session (material) from the ones you previously selected. This randomness ensures that you get a fresh new material each time you select the practice matertial.


   Have fun at it!!!



   Manually Offline Practice Sessions

These manual "offline" practice sessions allow you to print the testing materials and practice them on papers--a similar format you'll encounter when you take the real actual test with the USPS. These paper format practice sessions mimic exactly how the USPS testing format is laid out and taken by test takers.

So when you're ready, you can proceed to print the practice sessions by choosing the options below. Due to the nature of random selection, each time you press a selection (below), it will generate a different practice session (material) from the ones you previously selected. This randomness ensures that you get a fresh new material each time you select the practice matertial.


   Enjoy!!!